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Maryland Biodiversity Project

Maryland Biodiversity Project

Maryland Biodiversity Project is cataloging all the living things of Maryland. We promote science, education, and conservation by helping to build a vibrant Maryland nature study community. Visit www.marylandbiodiversity.com.

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The White-spotted Leafroller Moth (Argyrotaenia alisellana) is a small moth is the family Tortricidae. The genus Argyrotaenia has many notoriously difficult species to identify, but luckily, the White-spotted Leafroller's coppery brown coloration along with distinctive white patches make for easy identification. The host plants are various species of oaks.

White-spotted Leafroller Moths are found throughout the state. We still lack records for many counties, but this is most likely due to lack of surveys, not true absence. Maryland has one brood (Mid-May through mid-June). The last week of May seems to be the highpoint of the flight.

www.marylandbiodiversity.com/view/6095

Photo of a White-spotted Leafroller Moth by Jonathan Willey.
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The White-spotted Leafroller Moth (Argyrotaenia alisellana) is a small moth is the family Tortricidae. The genus Argyrotaenia has many notoriously difficult species to identify, but luckily, the White-spotted Leafrollers coppery brown coloration along with distinctive white patches make for easy identification. The host plants are various species of oaks.

White-spotted Leafroller Moths are found throughout the state. We still lack records for many counties, but this is most likely due to lack of surveys, not true absence. Maryland has one brood (Mid-May through mid-June). The last week of May seems to be the highpoint of the flight. 

https://www.marylandbiodiversity.com/view/6095

Photo of a White-spotted Leafroller Moth by Jonathan Willey.

Check out this beautiful image of an Eastern Whip-poor-will that Jonathan Irons documented along a roadside in Wicomico Co., Maryland.

The namesake calls of this species were once common on summer nights in Maryland. Unfortunately, as with many of our "aerial insectivores", the species has dramatically declined locally and throughout much of its range. Whip-poor-wills are now much more localized in high quality habitats sprinkled around the state, especially western Maryland and in pockets on the Eastern Shore. There are other bastions such as Soldiers Delight in Baltimore County and Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County. It's another good example of where the exceptions prove the rule. Where we have the proper habitat with healthy insect populations, these birds can still thrive. Unfortunately significant habitat loss and declines in insect biomass have shrunk the species' range. According to Cornell University, "their numbers declined by close to 2% per year between 1966 and 2019, resulting in a cumulative decline of about 61% during that time." Please support the Breeding Bird Atlas (BBA) and Audubon's Important Bird Area (IBA) program, as well as local efforts to protect remaining habitat. Any efforts to reduce or eliminate pesticide use will also benefit our insects and the other biodiversity that depend on them.

๐Ÿ“ธ: (c) Jonathan Irons - Wicomico Co., Maryland (6/16/2022).

More at Maryland Biodiversity Project:
www.marylandbiodiversity.com/view/1141

- Bill
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Check out this beautiful image of an Eastern Whip-poor-will that Jonathan Irons documented along a roadside in Wicomico Co., Maryland. 

The namesake calls of this species were once common on summer nights in Maryland. Unfortunately, as with many of our aerial insectivores, the species has dramatically declined locally and throughout much of its range. Whip-poor-wills are now much more localized in high quality habitats sprinkled around the state, especially western Maryland and in pockets on the Eastern Shore. There are other bastions such as Soldiers Delight in Baltimore County and Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County. Its another good example of where the exceptions prove the rule. Where we have the proper habitat with healthy insect populations, these birds can still thrive. Unfortunately significant habitat loss and declines in insect biomass have shrunk the species range. According to Cornell University, their numbers declined by close to 2% per year between 1966 and 2019, resulting in a cumulative decline of about 61% during that time. Please support the Breeding Bird Atlas (BBA) and Audubons Important Bird Area (IBA) program, as well as local efforts to protect remaining habitat. Any efforts to reduce or eliminate pesticide use will also benefit our insects and the other biodiversity that depend on them.

๐Ÿ“ธ: (c) Jonathan Irons - Wicomico Co., Maryland (6/16/2022).

More at Maryland Biodiversity Project:
https://www.marylandbiodiversity.com/view/1141

- Bill

Comment on Facebook

My husband and I live on a farm in Western MD near Green Ridge State Forest and we hear them consistently every night. I didn't realize how blessed we were to have them nearby (even if they are cranking out their song outside the window at 3am) until I saw so many comments on the MD birding page that they don't hear them anymore. We are always happy to have visitors to share the excitement of hearing the whip-poor wills (or the other many birds around our farm and pond), and we decided to use a guesthouse as a rental with bird lovers specifically in mind (called The Guest Nest...our farm was named "Blue Heron Farm" by the previous owners). We love to have people stop by to hear them!! I do very much wish they weren't on the decline, though.

Aww, hopefully it was safe from cars! We have some Chuck-will's-widow around our house here in St Mary's county, they're so loud at night but so cool! I thought they were frogs at first, I had to use the Merlin app, lol. I wonder if there are any of these guys.

I love their song but never get to hear it anymore.

Back in the 80s, we had one that came to every open window of the house at dawn to sing to us! Miss this sound

We live in Western Maryland near Frostburg and have one that sings to us every evening.

Use to put me to sleep when I was a kid. Live near the woods now and wishing one would move in!!

We are lucky enough to hear them from our house

My office is close to the Aberdeen Proving Ground Whip-poor-will site and I stop by for evening visits when I can. It's always nice to hear EWPWs there.

With the full moon and next week, it is the perfect time to hear them! They call especially when the moon is up and visible (not too cloudy).

Heard them every morning this turkey season

Please help protect Maryland wildlife habitat by opposing plans to cut (P-25-S-05) an older-growth section (100+ years) of Pocomoke State Forest. Some 98% of the trees will be cut and killed if the MD DNR Pocomoke State Forest work plan is carried out in 2025. (P-25-S-05) SPECIES: Sassafras (Sassafras albidum) Black gum (Nyssa sylvatica) Red maple (Acer rubrum) Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) Hickory (Carya sp.) White oak (Quercus alba) Southern red oak (Quercus falcata) American holly (Ilex opaca) American beech (Fagus grandifolia) Water oak (Quercus nigra) Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana) Tulip-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) Sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua) Dogwood (Cornus florida) Bayberry (Myrica cerifera) Mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia)

Brenda Carmean

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Wayne Longbottom documented this momma Virginia Opossum carrying her growing babies on her back in Queen Anne's Co., Maryland yesterday. America's only marsupial starts with tiny honeybee-sized babies in her pouch, which move out and into piggyback / possum-back mode as they mature. These cuties should be between 2 1/2 to 4 months old. Not only is Virginia Opossum the only marsupial in the U.S. and Canada, it's the the marsupial with the northernmost range in the world.

๐Ÿ“ธ: (c) Wayne Longbottom - Queen Anne's Co., Maryland (5/20/2024).

More at Maryland Biodiversity Project:
www.marylandbiodiversity.com/view/760

- Bill
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Wayne Longbottom documented this momma Virginia Opossum carrying her growing babies on her back in Queen Annes Co., Maryland yesterday. Americas only marsupial starts with tiny honeybee-sized babies in her pouch, which move out and into piggyback / possum-back mode as they mature. These cuties should be between 2 1/2 to 4 months old. Not only is Virginia Opossum the only marsupial in the U.S. and Canada, its the the marsupial with the northernmost range in the world. 

๐Ÿ“ธ: (c) Wayne Longbottom - Queen Annes Co., Maryland (5/20/2024).

More at Maryland Biodiversity Project:
https://www.marylandbiodiversity.com/view/760

- Bill

Comment on Facebook

And I hear they eat TICKS!

So cute!

Love love opossums ♥๏ธ Thanks for sharing!!

This attractive fly is a member of the genus Psellidotus. It is one of 34 soldier fly species (family Stratiomyidae) catalogued to date by the MBP community. Stratiomyidae is a very large family of true flies (Diptera) with over 2,700 species spanning 380 genera worldwide. The larvae of this family are extremely diverse in their specializations and habitat use.

๐Ÿ“ธ: (c) Adrienne van den Beemt, some rights reserved (CC BY, creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) - Prince George's Co., Maryland (5/11/2024).

More at Maryland Biodiversity Project:
www.marylandbiodiversity.com/view/21958

- Bill
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This attractive fly is a member of the genus Psellidotus. It is one of 34 soldier fly species (family Stratiomyidae) catalogued to date by the MBP community. Stratiomyidae is a very large family of true flies (Diptera) with over 2,700 species spanning 380 genera worldwide. The larvae of this family are extremely diverse in their specializations and habitat use. 

๐Ÿ“ธ: (c) Adrienne van den Beemt, some rights reserved (CC BY, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) -  Prince Georges Co., Maryland (5/11/2024). 

More at Maryland Biodiversity Project:
https://www.marylandbiodiversity.com/view/21958

- Bill

Facebook wanted us to do a post for World Baking Day. Instead, we decided to post a photo of a Mississippi Kite.

Mississippi Kites are one of Maryland's newest confirmed breeders. These aerial acrobats actively hunt insects while on the wing. In Maryland, nests have been confirmed on the Coastal Plain and Piedmont. Keep your eyes peeled for these stately birds of prey. You might find a new kite nest for the last year of the Maryland Breeding Bird Atlas!

Photo of a Mississippi Kite by Anthony Van Schoor.
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Facebook wanted us to do a post for World Baking Day. Instead, we decided to post a photo of a Mississippi Kite. 

Mississippi Kites are one of Marylands newest confirmed breeders. These aerial acrobats actively hunt insects while on the wing. In Maryland, nests have been confirmed on the Coastal Plain and Piedmont. Keep your eyes peeled for these stately birds of prey. You might find a new kite nest for the last year of the Maryland Breeding Bird Atlas!

Photo of a Mississippi Kite by Anthony Van Schoor.

Comment on Facebook

A beautiful shot! And way more interesting to me than a baking post. Thanks for ignoring that. ๐Ÿ˜„

I saw one once, wheeling over 21212, and it was so distinctive and surprising…

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