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Maryland Biodiversity Project

Maryland Biodiversity Project

Maryland Biodiversity Project is cataloging all the living things of Maryland. We promote science, ed

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Our MBP iNaturalist ingest process is so efficient that I can already share this beautiful Field Sparrow photo taken this very morning by Stephen John Davies (Montgomery County, Maryland).

More at Maryland Biodiversity Project:
www.marylandbiodiversity.com/view/1287

- Bill

#marylandbiodiversityproject #marylandbirds #birding #fieldsparrow
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Our MBP iNaturalist ingest process is so efficient that I can already share this beautiful Field Sparrow photo taken this very morning by Stephen John Davies (Montgomery County, Maryland). 

More at Maryland Biodiversity Project:
https://www.marylandbiodiversity.com/view/1287

- Bill

#marylandbiodiversityproject #marylandbirds #birding #fieldsparrow

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So we don’t need to select MBP on our observations, it gets to you automatically if it meets certain criteria?

Today is the anniversary of the first day of banding here at FBBO. On March 22, 1998 at 0650, FBBO founder and director Jim Gruber banded Carolina Chickadee #1950-07797, the first bird ever banded at FBBO.

We are now in our 26th year of migration monitoring having banded nearly 340,000 birds!

#FBBO #WashColl #RAFC #CACH #CarolinaChickadee #milestone #anniversary #March2022 #BirdBanding #MistNetting #AvianMonitoring #LongTermResearch #FBBOat25
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Congratulations ๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿ’• 25 impressive years!! Go FBBO!

My all time favorite essay is Aldo Leopold's 65290. www.eco-narratives.com/uploads/3/1/0/9/31098595/leopold_65290.pdf

I love when we receive juvenile fish photos from contributors doing aquatic surveys. Emilio Concari documented this juvenile Rock Bass in Frederick County in August 2022. ๐Ÿ˜

Rock Bass is a native freshwater species with a large range in the eastern U.S. It prefers clear, rocky habitats with some vegetation. They feed on insects, crustaceans, and smaller fish such as minnows. In Maryland, check out MBP's county and/or quad maps to see how its range ends at the coastal plain. Why? It's where the habitat rapidly changes from rocky to sandy. We call that line the Fall Line and it's roughly US Route 1 or I-95. No rocks, no Rock Bass. (At least in general and in our area!)

More at Maryland Biodiversity Project:
www.marylandbiodiversity.com/view/263

- Bill

#marylandbiodiversityproject #marylandfishes #fishing #rockbass
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I love when we receive juvenile fish photos from contributors doing aquatic surveys. Emilio Concari documented this juvenile Rock Bass in Frederick County in August 2022. ๐Ÿ˜

Rock Bass is a native freshwater species with a large range in the eastern U.S. It prefers clear, rocky habitats with some vegetation. They feed on insects, crustaceans, and smaller fish such as minnows. In Maryland, check out MBPs county and/or quad maps to see how its range ends at the coastal plain. Why? Its where the habitat rapidly changes from rocky to sandy. We call that line the Fall Line and its roughly US Route 1 or I-95. No rocks, no Rock Bass. (At least in general and in our area!)  

More at Maryland Biodiversity Project:
https://www.marylandbiodiversity.com/view/263

- Bill

#marylandbiodiversityproject #marylandfishes #fishing #rockbass

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Originally only native to Garrett and its waters that flow to Mississippi River drainage? My impression that its an introduced species to Atlantic coast streams in MD.

A bean ๐Ÿ˜ญโค๏ธ

Tufted Duck is a rare vagrant from Eurasia that is occasionally found in Maryland, nearly always amidst large flocks of scaup. Maryland has eleven records accepted by the MD/DCRC today. Fred Shaffer found an adult male at Fort Armistead on Sunday (3/19). For those interested, check out eBird for reports.

Tufted Duck at Maryland Biodiversity Project:
www.marylandbiodiversity.com/view/926

Today's photo of an adult male was my first in the state - Cambridge, Dorchester Co., Maryland (1/10/2009).

- Bill

#marylandbiodiversityproject #marylandbirds #rarebirds #abarare #tuftedduck
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Tufted Duck is a rare vagrant from Eurasia that is occasionally found in Maryland, nearly always amidst large flocks of scaup. Maryland has eleven records accepted by the MD/DCRC today. Fred Shaffer found an adult male at Fort Armistead on Sunday (3/19). For those interested, check out eBird for reports.

Tufted Duck at Maryland Biodiversity Project:
https://www.marylandbiodiversity.com/view/926

Todays photo of an adult male was my first in the state - Cambridge, Dorchester Co., Maryland (1/10/2009). 

- Bill 

#marylandbiodiversityproject #marylandbirds #rarebirds #abarare #tuftedduck

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Leah Frances, keep your eyes ๐Ÿ‘€ alert

Nice mullet!

Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia virginica) are an iconic spring wildflower species in the eastern U.S. They grow in rich woods, often on floodplains, and may form large stands. These stands are breathtaking and provide cover for many kinds of wildlife in the spring. They are primarily pollinated by long-tongued bees.

Virginia Bluebells have nodding clusters of flowers that are pinkish in bud, and blue (rarely white or pink) when fully open and mature. The flower color varies with soil acidity. The flowers are tubular at the base and flare into a bell-like shape towards the outer rim, where there are five shallow lobes.

Here in Maryland, Virginia Bluebells are mostly found in the mountains and Piedmont. They are rare to absent on much of the coastal plain, especially as one travels east and south in the state. You can find nice stands along the C&O Canal, along the Susquehanna River, and at Patuxent Research Refuge.

Photo courtesy of Wayne Longbottom - Anne Arundel Co., Maryland (4/16/2006).

More at Maryland Biodiversity Project:
www.marylandbiodiversity.com/view/2279

- Bill

#marylandbiodiversityproject #marylandplants #marylandplantatlas #nativeplants #virginiabluebells #signsofspring
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Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia virginica) are an iconic spring wildflower species in the eastern U.S. They grow in rich woods, often on floodplains, and may form large stands. These stands are breathtaking and provide cover for many kinds of wildlife in the spring. They are primarily pollinated by long-tongued bees.

Virginia Bluebells have nodding clusters of flowers that are pinkish in bud, and blue (rarely white or pink) when fully open and mature. The flower color varies with soil acidity. The flowers are tubular at the base and flare into a bell-like shape towards the outer rim, where there are five shallow lobes. 

Here in Maryland, Virginia Bluebells are mostly found in the mountains and Piedmont. They are rare to absent on much of the coastal plain, especially as one travels east and south in the state. You can find nice stands along the C&O Canal, along the Susquehanna River, and at Patuxent Research Refuge. 

Photo courtesy of Wayne Longbottom - Anne Arundel Co., Maryland (4/16/2006).

More at Maryland Biodiversity Project:
https://www.marylandbiodiversity.com/view/2279

- Bill

#marylandbiodiversityproject #marylandplants #marylandplantatlas #nativeplants #virginiabluebells #signsofspring

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Years ago I rescued some from around a tree the highway department was cutting down along a roadway. I moved them to our little patch of woods in Frederick county and they are just beautiful every spring.

A native plant of Virginia, I’ve planted them in my backyard. โค๏ธ

They are beginning to bloom in my wildflower beds as I write this.

They grow in Bel Air on Liriodendron grounds. Maybe were planted there?

They grow in the woods in the floodplain of the Little Patuxent.

At Governor Bridge natural area as well--so lovely!

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