No Common Name Leotia lubrica (Scopoli) Persoon    Synonyms: Chicken Lips, Greencap Jellybaby, Leotia viscosa, Yellow Jelly Baby.
Kingdom Fungi   >   Phylum Ascomycota   >   Class Leotiomycetes   >   Order Leotiales   >   Family Leotiaceae   >   Genus Leotia   

Status:

Leotia lubrica sensu lato includes both Leotia lubrica sensu stricto (Yellow Jellybaby) and Leotia viscosa (Greencap Jellybaby). As the common names imply, these two species were historically segregated based on the color of their caps. However, DNA-based phylogenetic investigations have found that these characteristics did not correspond to natural groups (Zhong and Pfister, 2004, Mycological Progress). Index Fungorum (May 2021) treats these species as synonyms. Additional taxonomic research is needed to determine the limits of Leotia lubrica.

Description:

Fruiting body: Yellow or orange-yellow, sometimes w/ olive tints; flesh soft, almost gelatinous. Fertile surface irregularly rounded/flattened, smooth/furrowed/brainlike, moist, rubbery. Stalk: Orange, scurfy or smooth, hollow, tapers up, sometimes flattened, often fused at base, flesh waxy (J. Solem, pers. comm.).

Where to find:

Found in groups or clusters in moss, duff, or decaying wood in hardwood or white pine forests.

There are 57 records in the project database.

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The ascomycete Leotia lubrica in Garrett Co., Maryland (8/9/2013). Photo by Matt Tillett. (MBP list)

Leotia lubrica (fruiting bodies) in Howard Co., Maryland (6/25/2015). Photo by Richard Orr. (MBP list)

Leotia lubrica in Washington Co., Maryland (7/5/2016). (c) Chia aka Cory Chiappone, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC). Photo by Chia aka Cory Chiappone via iNaturalist. (MBP list)

Leotia lubrica found in sandy soil under pines and oaks in Worcester Co., Maryland (10/16/2014). Photo by Lance Biechele. (MBP list)

Leotia lubrica in Howard Co., Maryland (8/26/2020). (c) Joanne and Robert Solem, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Leotia lubrica in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland (10/17/2020). (c) Serenella Linares, all rights reserved. Photo by Serenella Linares via iNaturalist. (MBP list)

Leotia lubrica in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland (10/17/2020). (c) sblaha, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC). Photo by sblaha via iNaturalist. (MBP list)

Leotia lubrica in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland (10/17/2020). (c) sblaha, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC). Photo by sblaha via iNaturalist. (MBP list)

Leotia lubrica in Howard Co., Maryland (7/2/2009). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Leotia lubrica in Baltimore City, Maryland (10/15/2020). (c) Thomas Tooke, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC). Photo by tmtooke via iNaturalist. (MBP list)

Spores of Leotia lubrica in Howard Co., Maryland (8/26/2020). (c) Joanne and Robert Solem, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Leotia lubrica in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland (10/17/2020). (c) Serenella Linares, all rights reserved. Photo by Serenella Linares via iNaturalist. (MBP list)

Leotia lubrica in Howard Co., Maryland (9/12/2020). (c) R. DN., some rights reserved (CC BY). Photo by R. DN. via iNaturalist. (MBP list)

Leotia lubrica in Baltimore City, Maryland (8/22/2020). (c) dangitmimi, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC). Photo by dangitmimi via iNaturalist. (MBP list)

Spores collected from a Leotia lubrica specimen in Howard Co., Maryland (6/25/2015). Cylindric/spindle-shaped (often curved), hyaline; measured 20.1-22.6 X 4.3-4.9 microns. Photo by Robert Solem. (MBP list)

Leotia lubrica in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland (7/5/2015). (c) botanygirl, some rights reserved (CC BY). Photo by botanygirl via iNaturalist. (MBP list)

Leotia lubrica in Howard Co., Maryland (9/12/2020). (c) R. DN., some rights reserved (CC BY). Photo by R. DN. via iNaturalist. (MBP list)


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