Common Brown Cup Peziza phyllogena Cooke  Synonyms: Peziza badioconfusa.

Status:

The Pezizas are in a state of flux. Most recent references lump several species into P. phyllogena. Some of these species like P. badioconfusus were considered individual species by some mycologists, but it seems safest to go with the majority and recent research which lumps them (J. Solem, pers. comm.).

Description:

Interior (fertile) surface usually olive-brown; exterior (infertile) surface reddish-brown; brittle. May be cup-shaped to flat; margin even or irregular (J. Solem, pers. comm.).

Where to find:

A cup fungus found as singles or groups in either conifer or hardwood forests on ground or rotting wood (J. Solem, pers. comm.).

There are 9 records in the project database.

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Common Brown Cup in Talbot Co., Maryland (4/23/2013). Determined by Lance Biechele. Photo by Jim Brighton. (MBP list)

Common Brown Cup in Howard Co., Maryland (5/13/2013). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Common Brown Cup in Howard Co., Maryland (4/20/2016). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Common Brown Cup in Howard Co., Maryland (5/8/2018). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Common Brown Cup in Worcester Co., Maryland (5/2014). Photo by Lance Biechele. (MBP list)

Common Brown Cup spores (above) and an ascus (below) containing spores collected in Howard Co., Maryland (5/8/2018). Spores ellipsoid/fusiform w/ oil drops, roughened, hyaline; measured 17.3-20.6-5 x 8.7-9.4 microns. Ascus measured 276 x 11.3 microns. Photo by Robert Solem. (MBP list)


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